Week 15: Final Week

What have you learned in the course about designing instruction from a multimedia perspective?

How would designing instruction be different from a constructivist perspective, based on what you read? Would it?


I have learned that there are some limitations and advantages of using certain forms of media. Combining all of the forms will help meet the individual needs of students, whether they want to listen, watch, or read the instructions.

 

Week 14: Progress

What have you learned thus far about designing instruction? What is different? What is the same as other forms of instruction?


Instruction design takes a lot of planning and work. While I worked on this individually, I think there is potential for an instruction to be developed by a team. Have a writer, a designer, a web developer, and a videographer come together to create content.

Week 13: Haziness

How has your journey of learning to use multi and single media to teach been so far? What have you learned? What would you still like to learn? What is still hazy?


As I wrap up the semester, it really does take a lot of work to develop content. I have certainly learned that each new form of media we covered had borrowed from previous forms. We see evidence of text, images, and audio in the video and website.

Week 12: Instruction with Video

What have you learned thus far about designing instruction from a video media perspective? What was beneficial? What was difficult? How did it change the way you think about learning and teaching?

What is helpful about using video versus a single medium for delivering instruction?


I think video is much beneficial. My topic is visual oriented. When I demonstrated my lesson, it was as if the learner could see me face-to-face. There are limitations with technology. I worked on my project on my laptop and the software uses up a lot of memory. An instructor will need the proper tools to create video.

Video is helpful because it incorporates all of the previous forms of media.

Week 10: Limitations?

What is different about developing instruction with both images and audio combined? Is it more efficient? Do you think about how you instruct someone differently? Are there limitations? Benefits? If so, what are they?


I think developing an instruction with both images and audio helps meet the individual needs of a student. I am hearing impaired, so audio alone would not work for me. However text and visuals are available in the instruction. Same thing for students with visual impairment but can work best with audio.

Week 9: Interactivity

What have you learned thus far about designing instruction from a multiple media perspective? How do you think the use of audio-visual instruction will benefit teaching and learning? What do you think will be potential issues with the use of audio-visual instruction? How do you think it will impact your teaching and learning?


An audio-visual instruction provides benefits for students who need visual, audio, or both to successfully learn from the instruction. However it is not enough. Sometimes further demonstration is needed.

Week 7: Audio-only instruction

How do you think the use of audio-only instruction will benefit teaching and learning? What do you think will be potential issues with the use of audio? How do you think it will impact your teaching and learning?

What do you think is helpful about using audio? how do you think it differs from using images and text?


Instruction that were offered in audio form may offer a different perspective and qualities that text and visual instruction may not offer. According to Barron (2008), human speech contains elements of expression, loudness, pitch, pace, and tone. An audience might not be able to detect the instructor’s voice in a text-only instruction but would definitely detect in audio-only instruction. According to research conducted by Taylor and Clark (2010), students liked the “informal, relaxed tone of their lecturer speaking to them. They described this as ‘personal’ and said it made them feel they were having some kind of ‘one on one’ consultation with their lecturer.” The podcasts in the study were used to extend knowledge and as a supplementary learning material.

Throughout human history, oral instruction was the primary means of communication and instruction (Barron, 2008). Oral communication has always been versatile and adapted to complement many other mediums such as electronic and digital video, presentations, electronic and digital audio, and many more. People with visual disabilities can learn more effectively from listening. Audio-only instruction can influence learning by providing emphasis on a topic and provide little distractions from the visual materials.

However audio-only instruction could be a problem for those with hearing disabilities or those who misheard the instruction the first time. Having visual images and text helps with learner comprehension. Audio-only methods are not for everyone and should be viewed as an option.

 

References

Barron, A. (2008). Auditory Instruction. In D. Jonassen (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology (pp. 949-978). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. Publishers.

Taylor, L. and Steve Clark. (2010). Educational Design of short, audio-only podcasts: The teacher and student experience. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 26, 386-399. doi: 10.14742/ajet.v26i3.1082. Retrieved from http://ajet.org.au/index.php/AJET/article/view/1082/339

 

Week 6: Visual and Text…room for improvement?

What is different about developing instruction with both images and text combined? Is it more efficient? Do you think about how you instruct someone differently? Are there limitations? Benefits? If so, what are they?


Project 3 is the combination of images and text. I created an e-Book with Adobe InDesign and incorporated the text from Project 1 and visuals from Project 2. I think the combination of images and text is much more efficient because the text explains the visuals in further detail. Visual and text combined together are much more beneficial than expressed individually.Gleeson (2013) argued that “purposeful visual resources can provide a learner with extra support outside and within the classroom environment.”  In the previous blog post I discussed how visuals improve reading comprehension. Fifty percent of our brains process visuals and we get a “sense of a visual scene in less than 1/10 of a second” (NeoMam Studios).

There are the limitations of relying primarily on imagery and text to provide instruction. Since people remember 80% of what they see and do (NeoMam Studios), then certainly there is room for improvement. Learners who are learning technical based topics such as my project, Beginner’s Product Photography, would benefit from watching the instructor’s example and engaging in the instruction, using more than one sense. Merely reading visual and textual instructions may not be enough for someone who isn’t very technology savvy.


References

Gleeson, M. (2013, July 14). Why we need more visual texts in our teaching and learning. Retrieved from http://mgleeson.edublogs.org/2013/07/14/2760/

NeoMam Studios. (n.d.). Thirteen Reasons Why Your Brains Crave Infographics. Retrieved from http://neomam.com/interactive/13reasons/

Week 5: Pairing text with images provides reading comprehension

What have you learned thus far about designing instruction from a multiple media perspective? How do you think the use of visual-text instruction will bennifit teaching and learning? What do you think will be potential issues with the use of visual-text instruction? How do you think it will impact your teaching and learning?

What do you think is better about using both images and text? What not? How do you feel about using multiple forms of media instead of a single medium for delivering instruction?


It is week 5 and so far we have worked on two instructional design projects: text-based instructional design and image-based instructional design. The next instructional design project will combine both text and images. While it seems fairly simple and common, it really made me stop and think how information can be communicated or taught in multiple ways. Sometimes we need to combine one or more methods to provide a clearer and concise message to the audience.

Pairing “concepts with meaningful images” makes it easier for learners to store information for a long time (Guiterrez, 2014). Textual information that is combined with visual information helps provide reading comprehension and connects patterns and relationships. Besides, pictures really makes text look good. 40 percent of learners are motivated to respond to visual information because pictures recreate the textual experience in their mind (Guiterrez, 2014).

However even though images and text work well with each other to help learners store information in the brain, it is not enough. There is potential to apply multiple human senses to reinforce cognitive and memory retention. Visual, auditory, olfactory (smell and taste), and tactile (touch) approaches should be mixed and matched and used to stimulate as many senses as possible (Lee, 2000). There is potential to include the auditory information with text and visual.


Reference

Guiterrez, K. (2014, July 8). Studies Confirm the Power of Visuals in eLearning. Retrieved from http://info.shiftelearning.com/blog/bid/350326/Studies-Confirm-the-Power-of-Visuals-in-eLearning

Lee, W., & Owens, D. (2000). Multimedia-based instructional design: Computer-based training, Web-based training, distance broadcast training. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.